Can you cap out your calorie burn?

16 TO 30% REDUCTION IN MORTALITY RATES AMONG MODERATELY INACTIVE INDIVIDUALS COMPARED WITH THE MOST INACTIVE. BOTTOM LINE: EVEN SMALL AMOUNTS OF EXERCISE CAN HELP YOU LIVE LONGER.

ACCORDING TO A NEW STUDY, the answer may be yes. Research published in Current Biology examined total energy expenditure from physical activity and how it related to total daily calorie burn. Researchers tracked subjects for about a week with a wearable device and measured energy through a specialized urine test. Moderately active people had higher daily energy expenditures—about 200 calories more—than the most sedentary subjects. But the most active actually plateaued in their total daily energy expenditures. “Your body’s homeostatic mechanisms are designed to increase or decrease calorie expenditure to maintain your body weight within a given range,” says clinical exercise physiologist Bill Sukala, Ph.D. That’s one big reason it’s considered much harder to lose weight through exercise alone versus dietary changes. But don’t quit that Tabata workout just yet: It’s important to have a mix of intensity and to keep your routine well rounded, rather than just focusing on how many calories you burn during an exercise session, notes Sukala. “Don’t just fixate on calories burned as a measure of success—some days you’ll burn more, some days less. Every workout is different.”

FAT – LOSS SECRET: Say Cheese

If you’re looking to slim down for summer, keep taking those selfies in front of the mirror! Research published in Peer J found that subjects who noticed their waistlines were shrinking were more likely to stick with a weight-loss routine. “On the first day of your program, measure your waist, hips, and weight and take front and side photos,” suggests Isaac Kuzmar, M.D., of the University of Alicante in Spain. Then do a weekly check-in. Even if the scale doesn’t shift much, you’ll see your appearance change—which may be all the encouragement you need to keep up the good work!