“How dangerous is it to put raw eggs in you smoothie?”

ONE LARGE EGG PROVIDES MORE THAN 6G OF PROTEIN— BUT CAN ALSO HARBOR DANGEROUS BACTERIA, UNLESS PASTEURIZED.

“Eating raw eggs is not without risk,” says Lauren Antonucci, M.S., R.D.N., the founding director of Nutrition Energy in New York City. According to the USDA, 2.3 million eggs are contaminated with salmonella each year. This bacteria is a common cause of foodborne illness, aka food poisoning, which can last up to one week and in some cases can make people seriously ill. Washing the eggs before eating them raw won’t help, since the bacteria can thrive inside the intact eggs, adds Antonucci. But there is a safer alternative to pumping up your post-workout concoction: Pasteurized eggs and liquid pasteurized egg whites have been treated to kill salmonella, making them safe to use in shakes and drinks without cooking them first. Just look for the word pasteurized on the label to make sure the eggs are bacteria-free.

“DOES IT MATTER WHICH TYPE OF LEG-PRESS MACHINE I USE AT THE GYM?”

“All leg presses help increase lower-body power, strengthening knee and hip extension, and the deceleration of knee and hip flexion,” says Jim Smith, C.P.P.S., owner of Diesel Strength and Conditioning. But foot placement can make a big difference in results. “Placing your feet wider apart and higher up on the plate will better target the hips, glutes, and hamstrings. Keeping them narrow and lower on the plate puts more focus on the quads while improving ankle mobility.” Just don’t get too carried away with the load you’re lifting, warns Smith. “You can typically press more weight than you squat, so don’t go as heavy on barbell squats.”

“I OFTEN PUT MY PHONE IN MY SPORTS BRA WHEN I’M WORKING OUT. IS THAT DANGEROUS?”

Sometimes there’s just no good place to keep a cell phone when you’re at the gym. But when it comes to cancer risks, don’t fret: Experts say there is no data to suggest a link between cell phone use and breast cancer, no matter where you stow your device. (Some controversy does remain about a link between cell phone use and brain cancer, but there are also no definitive studies that clarify this issue.) But keeping your phone in your bra while you exercise can create other unexpected problems. “We know that mobile phones may harbor several species of bacteria, and irritated or macerated skin (which can occur in sweaty areas prone to friction, like the area under a sports bra) is very susceptible to bacterial infections such as staphylococcus and streptococcus,” notes Lauren Ploch, M.D., a dermatologist in Augusta, GA. If you don’t have a pocket in which to put your phone, try stowing it on an armband or waist belt to help protect your skin while you work up a sweat.

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