Fibre curbs breast cancer risk

FRESH FRUITS AND VEGGIES can do more than just fuel your workout: The amount of produce you eat can also help lower your risk of breast cancer later in life, according to a study published in Pediatrics. Harvard researchers found that women who consume more high-fibre foods like spinach and raspberries when they’re young (starting at high school age) may have a lower risk for breast cancer later in life than those who eat less fibre. “While this study isn’t the final word on the link between fibre consumption and breast cancer prevention, it gives hope that we may be able to help women reduce their risk through a healthy diet,” says Frances Largeman-Roth, R.D., author of Eating in Color. Aim for 25 grams of dietary fibre daily, with a mix of soluble fibre (found in foods like grapefruit, broccoli, and strawberries) and insoluble fibre (found in whole grains and fruits with skin, like apples or pears).

COULD YOUR DIET USE CURD WHEY?

Maybe Miss Muffett had the right idea. Curd whey—aka cottage cheese—is rich in protein (23g in 1 cup) and calcium (174 milligrams). “Cottage cheese is the combo of curds and whey: The curds are the lumps, and the whey is the liquid portion,” explains Torey Armul, R.D., a nutritionist in Columbus, OH. Curds are high in slow-absorbing casein protein, while whey digests more quickly. Add to smoothies, or combine with fresh fruit.

DON’T EAT THIS BEFORE GOING TO BED

Need a snack before turning in for the night? Steer clear of cheat foods like ice cream or cookies if you’re hitting the gym in the a.m.: A recent study in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine found that eating foods that are low in fibre and high in saturated fat and sugar can make for a worse night’s sleep. Subjects who had more high-fibre foods throughout the day, on the other hand, spent more time in restorative slow-wave sleep stages. If you must munch before bed, keep it around 200 calories or fewer, suggests New York–based nutritionist Lisa Stollman. Think fresh fruit, air-popped popcorn, or ¼ cup nuts.

50 PERCENTAGE MORE OF OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS FOUND IN ORGANIC MEATS AND DAIRY COMPARED WITH CONVENTIONAL FOODS.
SOURCE: THE BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION

 

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