GMO salmon

COMING TO A GROCERY store near you later this year: the country’s first genetically modified animal. Called the AquAdvantage, it’s part Atlantic salmon and part chinook salmon, with some genes from a few other fish to boost growth. But is this salmon safe to eat?

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“We are already seeing so many issues with autoimmunity, steroids, and antibiotic use in our food, we don’t need more genetically altered food,” says Taz Bhatia, M.D., author of What Doctors Eat. “We don’t know the long-term effects of this new fish on our health, the environment, or the food chain.”

But not all medical experts dismiss GMO altogether. “There is a notion that this is ‘Frankenfood,’ ” says David L. Katz, M.D., director of Yale University Prevention Research
Center. “But if the nutritional composition is the same, it may have no impact at all on how
the food is handled by your body.” While people deserve to know if their food is genetically
modified or not, adds Katz, “I don’t think summary judgment about GMO is warranted.”

LIVING ALONE MAY TAKE A TOLL ON YOUR DIET
Cooking for one? Don’t let that be your excuse for having more cheat days. While research from the Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia, shows that people who live alone are more likely to have poorer diets, eating solo doesn’t have to mean a lifetime of bad eating habits. The study found a lack of cooking skills, high food costs, and low motivation to prep food were the biggest reasons solo diners ate poorly. But there are plenty of perks to dining alone: You have to please only your own palate. “Prepare what you like and what fits into your diet,” says Kristen F. Gradney, R.D., a nutritionist based in Louisiana. Buying already prepped items (think peeled, chopped butternut squash or shaved brussels sprouts) can also be convenient and cost-effective. Living alone can actually mean less cooking, too! Prepare vegetables and sides in bulk and then freeze in small portions, so you can have plenty of healthy options ready any day of the week.

EAT MORE OF THESE CARBS TO LOSE WEIGHT
Trying to shed some off-season weight gain? Look to fiber-rich foods and beverages to help you feel full on fewer calories. Over the years, research has shown high-fiber diets can lead to lower body weight. Some of the best high-fiber foods include fruits like raspberries and strawberries, whole-grain breads, peas, broccoli, beans, and air-popped popcorn. If convenience counts, consider taking a fiber supplement. We like BarnDad’s FiberDX, a 100% natural fiber shake supplement that offers 11 grams of fiber plus 7 grams of protein and comes in yummy flavors like German Chocolate and Strawberry Cream.

THE BODY TYPE MOST LIKELY TO BINGE EAT
The more fat women (aka an apple shape) store in their abdomen, the greater their risk of developing loss-of-control eating, according to research in The American Society for Nutrition. More research is needed to pinpoint a biological mechanism for these findings, but hormones like leptin and adiponectin might be involved. “It’s possible that if a centralized distribution of fat alters those hormonal messages sent to your brain, it could contribute to a drive to keep eating,” says study lead author Laura A. Berner, Ph.D. Although you can’t control where your body holds fat, eating healthy will minimize weight gain and help you maintain a positive outlook.

8.5 NUMBER OF POUNDS THAT DIETERS WHO FOLLOWED A LOW-CARB, HIGHER-FAT DIET LOST OVER A YEAR—ABOUT 30% MORE THAN THOSE WHO FOLLOWED A LOW-FAT DIET.

 

 

 

 

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