Just a spoonful of sugar

“PHYSICAL FITNESS IS NOT ONLY ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT KEYS TO A HEALTHY BODY, IT IS THE BASIS OF DYNAMIC AND CREATIVE INTELLECTUAL ACTIVITY.”

John F. Kennedy

Before your next big physical event, like a Mud Run or CrossFit Benchmark WOD, try a trick discovered by researchers at the U. of Bath in England. Their study tested various carb concoctions on long-distance cyclists’ endurance and levels of glycogen (or energy) in the liver and found that to maximize energy, or carb availability, you should use table sugar, a type of sucrose, to keep the pace up. Recommendations are to take about 1½ tablespoons of sugar diluted in 3½ ounces of water each hour for exercise lasting more than 2½ hours.

SLEEP WORKS
Along with all the other important benefits of getting a good night’s sleep—better memory, enhanced immune system, improved muscle recovery—research recently published in PLOS Medicine established that physically inactive people who sit for most of the day and sleep less than seven hours a day or more than nine hours a day are more than four times as likely to die early than a person with a healthy lifestyle.

MIDLIFE & FITNESS
Rest assured that just by picking up this magazine and following our time- and gymtested
tips, you are most likely extending your life. A new study from Vanderbilt University Medical Center found that people in midlife who have high levels of fitness go on to have much lower annual health bills when they get past age 65. Researchers studied almost 20,000 people over 22 years from age 49 to 71 and worked out that the fit subjects saved about $5,000 in health-care costs each year once they got into their golden years.

THANKS FOR THE MEMORIES
Forget to do cardio again? Research out of the Boston University School of Medicine may, ahem, jog your memory the next time you pass the treadmill. The study tested adults ages 18 to 35 on their aerobic capacity on a treadmill, then used an MRI to view areas of the brain that deal with memory. Those with higher aerobic fitness had more gray matter in the memory banks, supporting previous data that suggests cardio can play a role in preventing cognitive decline as you age.

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